Mr. Eccles Presents | OCC the Skeptical Caveman: Spark of Truth


Visit the Skeptics Guide to the Universe website and podcast:http://www.theskepticsguide.org

On Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/theskepticsg…

On Twitter:https://twitter.com/skepticsguide

Watch Ep1 here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUca2…

Watch Ep0 here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1X1F…

Watch Ep2 here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dXC3…

Watch Ep3 here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1MqPl…

Mr. Eccles Presents | OCC the Skeptical Caveman: A Lie by Any Other Name


Visit the Skeptics Guide to the Universe website and podcast:http://www.theskepticsguide.orgOn Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/theskepticsg…On Twitter:https://twitter.com/skepticsguideWatch Ep0 here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1X1F…Watch Ep1 here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUca2…Watch Ep2 here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?

Mr. Eccles Presents | Cinema, Blockbusters, Horror, and Mystery


Scott Derrickson is a film-lover first and a director second, but he’s been quite successful at the latter — you may know him as the director and co-writer of Marvel’s Doctor Strange. (When I was younger, Doctor Strange was one of my favorite comic characters, along with Green Lantern. At least one of them got a great movie.)

Scott was gracious enough to take time from a very busy schedule to sit down for a chat about a wide number of topics. Using Doctor Strange as a template, we go in some detail through the immensely complicated process of taking a modern blockbuster movie from pitch to screen. But Scott’s genre of choice is horror — his other films include Sinister and The Exorcism of Emily Rose — and we move on to discussing why certain genres seem universal, before tackling even bigger issues about worldviews (Scott is Christian, I’m a naturalist) and how they affect one’s life and work.

Scott Derrickson is an acclaimed director, producer, and screenwriter. He earned his M.A. in film production from the University of Southern California. His films as a director include Hellraiser: Inferno, The Exorcism of Emily Rose, The Day the Earth Stood Still, Sinister, Deliver Us from Evil, and Doctor Strange. He has written or co-written numerous other films, including Land of Plenty (directed by Wim Wenders) and Devil’s Knot (directed by Atom Egoyan).

Mr. Eccles Presents | Cinema, Blockbusters, Horror, and Mystery


Scott Derrickson is a film-lover first and a director second, but he’s been quite successful at the latter — you may know him as the director and co-writer of Marvel’s Doctor Strange. (When I was younger, Doctor Strange was one of my favorite comic characters, along with Green Lantern. At least one of them got a great movie.) Scott was gracious enough to take time from a very busy schedule to sit down for a chat about a wide number of topics. Using Doctor Strange as a template, we go in some detail through the immensely complicated process of taking a modern blockbuster movie from pitch to screen.

But Scott’s genre of choice is horror — his other films include Sinister and The Exorcism of Emily Rose — and we move on to discussing why certain genres seem universal, before tackling even bigger issues about worldviews (Scott is Christian, I’m a naturalist) and how they affect one’s life and work. Scott Derrickson is an acclaimed director, producer, and screenwriter. He earned his M.A. in film production from the University of Southern California. His films as a director include Hellraiser: Inferno, The Exorcism of Emily Rose, The Day the Earth Stood Still, Sinister, Deliver Us from Evil, and Doctor Strange. He has written or co-written numerous other films, including Land of Plenty (directed by Wim Wenders) and Devil’s Knot (directed by Atom Egoyan).

Mr. Eccles Presents | Blasphemy Laws as Tools of Oppression


From the YouTube page:

Robyn Blumner, President and CEO of the Center for Inquiry, warns that blasphemy laws are being used as tools of oppression against atheists. “Any law that criminalizes apostasy or the defamation of religion is an unjust law.”

Delivered September 18, 2018 at the 39th session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva.

Help CFI fight for freedom of expression and belief around the world! Donate today: https://centerforinquiry.org/support – – – –

Thank you, Mr. President, The Center for Inquiry stands for the rights of atheists and nonbelievers around the world. Today, we are urging the Council to remember that those of us who reject religion have a right to live and speak freely. According to media reports, there is an effort being promoted by Pakistan for the adoption of new international strictures on blasphemy. Any move in that direction would be devastating to freedom of conscience, and would directly conflict with the Rabat Plan of Action that urged the repeal of blasphemy laws where they exist.

Any law that criminalizes apostasy or the defamation of religion is an unjust law.

Blasphemy laws are used as tools of repression against nonbelievers. They give vigilantes an excuse to commit violent acts, and governments a justification to shutdown valid debate and religious criticism.

The number of atheists around the world is growing, which in our view is a positive outcome. But whatever one thinks of atheists, the international human rights community has an obligation to protect our rights alongside that of any other religious minority.

Mr. Eccles Presents | Thought, Language, and How to Understand the Brain


Blog post with show notes: http://traffic.libsyn.com/seancarroll…

Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/seanmcarroll

Language comes naturally to us, but is also deeply mysterious. On the one hand, it manifests as a collection of sounds or marks on paper. On the other hand, it also conveys meaning – words and sentences refer to states of affairs in the outside world, or to much more abstract concepts. How do words and meaning come together in the brain?

David Poeppel is a leading neuroscientist who works in many areas, with a focus on the relationship between language and thought. We talk about cutting-edge ideas in the science and philosophy of language, and how researchers have just recently climbed out from under a nineteenth-century paradigm for understanding how all this works.

David Poeppel is a Professor of Psychology and Neural Science at NYU, as well as the Director of the Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics in Frankfurt, Germany. He received his Ph.D. in cognitive science from MIT. He is a Fellow of the American Association of Arts and Sciences, and was awarded the DaimlerChrysler Berlin Prize in 2004. He is the author, with Greg Hickok, of the dual-stream model of language processing.