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Mr. Eccles Presents | Suspicious Minds: Why We Believe Conspiracy Theories

 

“Why do people believe conspiracy theories? What’s the harm if they do? And just what is a conspiracy theory, anyway? Conspiracy theories captured the attention of philosophers and historians decades ago, but it is only within the last few years that psychologists have begun gathering data on these kinds of questions. In this talk, Rob Brotherton provides a psychological perspective on conspiracism, drawing on his own research as well as other insights explored in his book Suspicious Minds: Why We Believe Conspiracy Theories. In particular, research into cognitive biases and heuristics – quirks in the way our brains are wired – suggests that we’re all intuitive conspiracy theorists; some of us just hide it better than others. Rob Brotherton is an academic psychologist. He completed a PhD on the psychology of conspiracy theories with the Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit at Goldsmiths, University of London. He now lives in New York City and teaches classes on conspiracy theories, social psychology, and science communication at Barnard College. This talk was recorded live at CSICon Las Vegas on Saturday, October 28th 2017. See more at reasonabletalk.tv!”

Mr. Eccles Presents | The Nature of Sound – Symphony of Science


A journey into the world of sound and music with Brian Greene, Bill Nye, Yehudi Menuhin and more. Sound has always fascinated me – the way mere vibrations in the air can evoke such strong emotions, and how humans create our own meaning from arbitrary motion of molecules. We are like gods, building huge cathedrals of sonic beauty from minute, invisible physical forces that surround us. Download the song here: https://melodysheep.bandcamp.com/albu… More videos at: http://symphonyofscience.com Follow & subscribe: @musicalscience youtube.com/melodysheep

Mr. Eccles Presents | George Hrab – Rethinking Doubt: the Values and Achievements of Skepticism

Here, George Hrab gives the low-down on the importance and general good sense of our very human capacity to doubt and ask valid questions, no matter the answers we may get or who they might upset, especially ourselves.

Courtesy of the TEDx Talks YouTube channel

This talk explains why being skeptical–as opposed to being cynical or denialist–is a good thing. Having doubts or reservations has led to some of humanity’s greatest achievements.

George Hrab has written and produced seven independent CDs and one concert DVD; published two books; recorded hundreds of episodes of an award winning podcast; and has emceed numerous international science conferences, all while being the drummer for The Philadelphia Funk Authority. He’s travelled to four continents promoting critical thinking, science, and skepticism through story and song. George is considered one of the preeminent skeptic/science/atheist/geek-culture music icons currently living in his apartment.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx