Richard Dawkins on Clarke’s Third Law

Dawkins at the University of Texas at Austin.

Dawkins at the University of Texas at Austin. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Clarke’s Third Law doesn’t work in reverse. Given that ‘any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic,’ it does not follow that ‘any magical claim that anybody may make at any time is indistinguishable from a technological advance that will come some time in the future.’ … There have admittedly been occasions when authoritative, pontificating skeptics have come away with egg on their faces, even within their own lifetimes. But there have been a far greater number of occasions when magical claims have never been vindicated. An apparent magical claim might eventually turn out to be true. In any age there are so many magical claims that are, or could be, made. They can’t all be true; many are mutually contradictory; and we have no reason to suppose that, simply by the act of sitting down and dreaming up a magical claim, we shall make it come true in some future technology. Some things that would surprise us today will come true in the future. But lots and lots of things that would surprise us today will not come true ever.”

One thought on “Richard Dawkins on Clarke’s Third Law

Commenting below. No spam or trolling, or my cats will be angry.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.